Motion in Limine on Magic Tricks

Overlawyered links to an interesting post on the Law and Magic Blog on a motion in limine to prevent the defense lawyer from attempting “to perform magic tricks and/or magic acts in the presentation of his clients’ case to the jury.” In response, the defendant’s lawyer argues:

That the undersigned counsel opted to travel the globe to learn a special set of performance skills rather than wasting his brain cells drinking his summers away at the Jersey Shore should not be held against him,” and “respondent counsel understands his role in the legal process, is respectful of same and would never dishonor the Court with cheap parlor tricks-(especially when Las Vegas quality illusions are so readily known and available to him.)

Attention all Plaintiffs’ lawyers encountering this lawyer: who cares? Do you really think defense lawyer’s ability to perform magic tricks is going to impact your verdict? I can think of a thousand easy mark responses to counter that the defendant’s lawyer is using magic tricks. I’ll go as far as to say I think plaintiffs’ lawyers should want the defense lawyer to perform magic tricks.